Facebook said to running massive propaganda operation

This is an update to the previous item, below.

According to Gizmodo, quoting former Facebook workers:

Facebook workers routinely suppressed news stories of interest to conservative readers from the social network’s influential “trending” news section, according to a former journalist who worked on the project. This individual says that workers prevented stories about the right-wing CPAC gathering, Mitt Romney, Rand Paul, and other conservative topics from appearing in the highly-influential section, even though they were organically trending among the site’s users.

Source: Former Facebook Workers: We Routinely Suppressed Conservative News

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How social media propaganda silences dissent

The “spiral of silence” is a well-researched phenomenon in which people suppress unpopular opinions to fit in and avoid social isolation. It has been looked at in the context of social media and the echo-chamber effect, in which we tailor our opinions to fit the online activity of our Facebook and Twitter friends.

Source: Mass surveillance silences minority opinions, according to study – The Washington Post

Rather than increasing perspectives, social media naturally enforces a conformity in ideas, in order that people avoid feeling like outcasts. Consider this in terms of social media propaganda: if your news feed is filled with propaganda posters expressing group beliefs (even when factually or logically wrong), you will be less likely to express alternative beliefs (even when factually or logically correct). In this way, social media propaganda not only serves to further an organization’s agenda but acts to suppress dissent.

This concept is not new. When I was in elementary school, decades ago, a friend used to get a group of kids together and then go up to an unsuspecting kid and tell a “joke” that made no sense and was not funny. But all the kids who were “in” on the deal would break out laughing – as would the unsuspecting target who succumbed to instant peer group pressure. Social media is the same idea, but on a global scale.

Denmark Fairy Tales: Denmark does not have a 33 hour work week

DenmarkPoster2TL;DR  Summary

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The most spectacular example of social media propaganda – so far!

11694954_1666895460210336_8548751201993760462_nTL; DR Summary

  • This poster is designed to lead you to the conclusion someone died because Republicans fund wars rather than highway infrastructure.
  • But your conclusion, based on the provided evidence trail, is not just wrong but spectacularly wrong when you see the full set of evidence.
  • This poster was shared over 25,000 times within 24 hours of appearing on Facebook, making it one of the most effective propaganda posters I have seen.

This poster is elegant in its design, use of “anchoring” and logical fallacy – but the poster is a work of fiction and an outright lie.  Yet it successfully engaged System 1’s quick and intuitive thinking to lead viewers into a false conclusion, and whose viewers then quickly shared it with their friends, encouraging their friends to reach the same false conclusion.

Read through to learn how false this poster is – yet why it worked as such a spectacular piece of social media propaganda.

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How pro sports uses the national anthem for promotional propaganda

CaptureTL;DR Summary

  • Why do we play the national anthem at sports events?
  • Why do we have the emotional re-uniting of families with a service member returned from overseas at sports events?
  • These seemingly spontaneous events of joy and patriotism are often paid endorsements from the marketing budget of the the US Department of Defense.
  • In the case of the Superbowl, the symbolism is taken to an extreme to link pro sports with patriotism, military and nationalist pride.

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Nature Valley: Association and Transference in social media marketing

11181730_1680718155494733_1656437490448346584_nTL; DR Summary

  • This promotional messaging associates positives feelings about nature with their product.
  • They encourage sharing this with the specified hashtag.
  • This example also illustrates the use of social media propaganda posters in marketing campaigns and promotions.

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The emotional jolts per minute metric – and no one cares if its fake news

TL;DR Summary:

  • TV news, especially, but print news too, relies on a concept of “emotional jolts per minute” to engage their viewer or reader.
  • An emotionally jolted viewer or reader is more likely to retain the story in their head.
  • An emotionally jolted person is more susceptible to advertising messages, which is good for the business.
  • The Washington Post ended their Internet meme fact checking column because they discovered that no one cares if the meme is false; as long as it agrees with their preexisting bias and ideology, it must be true!

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Kafkatrapping, a logical fallacy used frequently in arguments

TL;DR Summary:

  • Kafkatrapping is an argumentative form used frequently in propaganda messaging to convince you of someone’s agenda.
  • If you have seen the movie, Monty Python’s The Holy Grail, you may remember that “only a witch would deny she is a witch”.  That’s kafkatrapping! A denial is confirmation!
  • There is no possible defense to the accusation. The argument is framed in a way that to deny the argument is admit that you are guilty!

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Assertion (False): Obamas lost their law licenses

TL;DR Summary: HOW IT WORKS: An Internet meme sounds plausible but it is not true at all. The best propaganda usually sounds plausible!

12165963_147369102284545_2026046136_nMethod: Assertion (all untrue).

Goal: To encourage doubts about the Obamas. Since it does not call for a specific action by the viewer, this could be considered “pre-propaganda” preparing the target for later messaging and a call to action.

Scorecard: Widely distributed in right wing circles even though it is false.

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